Immunisations & Vaccinations

Please click here to see the latest NHS routine immunisation schedule.  Please note this schedule is regularly updated.

Immunisation Schedule (reviewed May 2016)

 
2 Months          
  • DTAP/IPV(polio)Hib (diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophiluls influenzae type b – all in one injection. Pediacel, plus
  • PCV (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) – in a separate injection: Prevanar 13
  • Rotarix (rotavirus gastroenteritis) – oral drops
  • Meningococcal Group B (MenB)
3 Months
  • DTaP/IPV(polio)Hib (2nd dose Pediacel), plus
  • MenC (meningitis C) – in a separate injection: NeisVac-C or Mejugate Kit
  • Rotarix (rotavirus gastroenteritis) – oral drops
4 Months
  • DTaP/IPV(polio)Hib (3rd dose Pediacel), plus
  • PCV (2nd dose: Prevenar 13) – in a separate injection
  • Meningococcal Group B (MenB)
Between 12 & 13 Months
  • Hib/MenC (combined as one injection) – 4th dose of Hib and 2nd dose of MenC: Mentorix, plus
  • MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) – combined as one injection: Priorix or MMRII, plus
  • PCV (3rd dose: Prevanar 13) – in a separate injection
  • Meningococcal Group B (MenB)
2, 3 & 4 years
  • Nasal flu spray: Fluenz
Between 3 years and 4 months to 5 years
  • Pre-school booster of DTaP/IPV(polio): Repevax or Infanrix-IPV, plus
  • MMR (second dose: Priorix or MMRII) – in a separate injection
Around 11-13 years (girls)
  • HPV (human papillomavirus types 16 & 18) – 2 injections: Gardasil. The second injection is given 6-24 months after the first one.
Around 13-18 years
  • Td/IPV(polio) booster: Revaxis
  • MenC (booster dose): NeisVac or Menjugate Kit – in a separate injection
Adults
  • Influenza and PCV - for those aged over 65 years and also those in a high risk group including those who are pregnant
  • Td/IPV(polio) – for those not fully immunised as a child: Revaxis
  • DTaP/IPV(polio) – for pregnant women 28-38 weeks pregnant
  • Shingles (Zostavax) – for selected cohorts of adults aged 70-79 years
  • Immunisations for all high school aged children are normally offered within the school immunisation programme.
  • BCG vaccination is no longer part of the routine school vaccination programme, instead BCG vaccine will be offered and targeted only to those considered to be in a high risk group.
  • If your children have missed any of their immunisations, the practice nurse will be happy to discuss this with you and review how to ensure your child is fully protected.

Meningitis ACWY Vaccine

Teenagers and university students are to be offered a vaccination to prevent Meningitis W disease.

From August 2015, all 17 – 18 year olds in school year 13 and first time university students up to the age of 25 will be offered the Meningitis ACWY vaccine as part of the NHS vaccination programme.  The Meningitis ACWY vaccine protects against four different causes of Meningitis and septicaemia - meningococcal (Men) A, C,W and Y diseases.

There will also be a catch-up vaccination programme for current school year 10 students through schools from January 2016.  The Meningitis ACWY vaccine will also be added to the routine adolescent schools programme (school years 9 or 10) from Autumn 2015, alongside the 3-in-1 teenage booster, and as a direct replacement for the Meningitis C Vaccination.

There has also been expansion of the cohort in 2016 to allow for the vaccination of 19-25 year old non-freshers.

Why do teenagers and students need MeningitisW vaccination?

Cases of Meningitis and septicaemia (blood poisoning) caused by Meningitis W bacteria are rising, due to a particularly deadly strain.  Older teenagers and university students are at high risk of infection because they tend to live in close contact in shared accommodation, such as university halls of residence.

Meningitis ACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm.  There are two Meningitis ACWY vaccines that will be used in the vaccination programme, these are called Nimenrix and Menveo.   They are very similar and both work equally well.

Who should not have the Meningitis ACWY vaccine?

You should not have the Meningitis ACWY vaccine if you are allergic to the vaccine or any of its ingredients.  You should also check with the doctor or nurse before having the Meningitis ACWY vaccine if you:

  • have a bleeding problem, such as haemophilia, or bruise easily
  • have a high temperature
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

If you wish to receive this vaccination please make an appointment at reception.

Your Neighbourhood Professionals Lenore Dunmore Counselling
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Shotfield, Wallington, Surrey, SM6 0HY
  • Telephone 020 8669 7612
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Your Neighbourhood Professionals Lenore Dunmore Counselling
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